New City

Design, science fiction, art, space, culture, childhood, life. Curated by Joe and Chris.

starblade:

The Standard of the World, once…
Cadillac Coupe DeVilles: 1960, ‘61, ‘63, ‘65, and ‘67; plus ‘67 Eldorado.

starblade:

The Standard of the World, once…

Cadillac Coupe DeVilles: 1960, ‘61, ‘63, ‘65, and ‘67; plus ‘67 Eldorado.

futuramobiles:

2006 Colani Streamline Mobile Home

starblade:

Impromptu Mid-Century Modern Color Palette

starblade:

Impromptu Mid-Century Modern Color Palette

brucesterling:

*There’s something to this, but if you take the trouble to hang out with actual futurists you’ll see that they don’t really do much of this…  On the contrary, they’d glance at that image on the bottom and go “Oh yeah, that’s the classic Detroit Rust Belt model.  That scenario was big during the 1970s Energy Crisis.”

The 40 highest authority Twitter profiles in the network are:
@iftf – Institute for the Future@WorldFutureSoc – World Future Society@rossdawson – Ross Dawson@gleonhard – Gerd Leonhard@DefTechPat – Patrick Tucker@Urbanverse – Cindy Frewen@VenessaMiemis – Venessa Miemis@cshirky – Clay Shirky@cascio – Jamais Cascio@bruces – Bruce Sterling@mitchbetts – Mitch Betts@frankspencer – Frank Spencer@futuryst – Stuart Candy@johnmsmart – John Smart@Geofutures – Josh Calder@ThomasFrey – Thomas Frey@doctorow – Cory Doctorow@heathervescent – Heather Schlegel@psaffo – Paul Saffo@MareeConway – Maree Conway@dunagan23 – Jake Dunagan@jenjarratt – Jennifer Jarratt@kevin2kelly – Kevin Kelly@wendyinfutures – Wendy L Schultz@patrickdixon – Patrick Dixon@Joi – Joi Ito@GreatDismal – William Gibson@futuristpaul – Paul Higgins@futuramb – P A Martin Börjesson@kristinalford – Kristin Alford@nraford – Noah Raford@avantgame – Jane McGonigal@DavidBrin – David Brin@jhagel – John Hagel@fastfuture – Rohit Talwar@singularityhub – Singularity Hub@singularityu – SingularityU@futureguru – Dr. James Canton@timeguide – Ian Pearson@FutureCon – Future Conscience
Read more: http://rossdawson.com/articles/futurists-twitter-analysis-network-centrality/#ixzz3BrJtP4IX

brucesterling:

*There’s something to this, but if you take the trouble to hang out with actual futurists you’ll see that they don’t really do much of this…  On the contrary, they’d glance at that image on the bottom and go “Oh yeah, that’s the classic Detroit Rust Belt model.  That scenario was big during the 1970s Energy Crisis.”

The 40 highest authority Twitter profiles in the network are:

@iftf – Institute for the Future
@WorldFutureSoc – World Future Society
@rossdawson – Ross Dawson
@gleonhard – Gerd Leonhard
@DefTechPat – Patrick Tucker
@Urbanverse – Cindy Frewen
@VenessaMiemis – Venessa Miemis
@cshirky – Clay Shirky
@cascio – Jamais Cascio
@bruces – Bruce Sterling
@mitchbetts – Mitch Betts
@frankspencer – Frank Spencer
@futuryst – Stuart Candy
@johnmsmart – John Smart
@Geofutures – Josh Calder
@ThomasFrey – Thomas Frey
@doctorow – Cory Doctorow
@heathervescent – Heather Schlegel
@psaffo – Paul Saffo
@MareeConway – Maree Conway
@dunagan23 – Jake Dunagan
@jenjarratt – Jennifer Jarratt
@kevin2kelly – Kevin Kelly
@wendyinfutures – Wendy L Schultz
@patrickdixon – Patrick Dixon
@Joi – Joi Ito
@GreatDismal – William Gibson
@futuristpaul – Paul Higgins
@futuramb – P A Martin Börjesson
@kristinalford – Kristin Alford
@nraford – Noah Raford
@avantgame – Jane McGonigal
@DavidBrin – David Brin
@jhagel – John Hagel
@fastfuture – Rohit Talwar
@singularityhub – Singularity Hub
@singularityu – SingularityU
@futureguru – Dr. James Canton
@timeguide – Ian Pearson
@FutureCon – Future Conscience



Read more: http://rossdawson.com/articles/futurists-twitter-analysis-network-centrality/#ixzz3BrJtP4IX

comicsworkbook:

Chris Ware

Just wanted to write something about Chris Ware’s Building Stories. What an astonishing achievement. I feel as though Ware has assembled a new phrasing style. He’s doing his thing – it’s definitely his voice – yet he is “phrasing” notes and chords in a new way that reminds me of the way, say, Ellington changed over his career. Retaining that “big sound” regardless of the size of the band.

Read More

brucesterling:

*You should buy this book so that more universities will come up with weird projects like this.
http://www.harpercollins.com/9780062204691/hieroglyph
About the Book

Inspired by New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson, an anthology of stories, set in the near future, from some of today’s leading writers, thinkers, and visionaries that reignites the iconic and optimistic visions of the golden age of science fiction.
In his 2011 article “Innovation Starvation,” Neal Stephenson argued that we—the society whose earlier scientists and engineers witnessed the airplane, the automobile, nuclear energy, the computer, and space exploration—must reignite our ambitions to think boldly and do Big Stuff. He also advanced the Hieroglyph Theory which illuminates the power of science fiction to inspire the inventive imagination: “Good SF supplies a plausible, fully thought-out picture of an alternate reality in which some sort of compelling innovation has taken place.”
In 2012, Arizona State University established the Center for Science and the Imagination to bring together writers, artists, and creative thinkers with scientists, engineers, and technologists to cultivate and expand on “moon shot ideas” that inspire the imagination and catalyze real-world innovations.
Now comes this remarkable anthology uniting twenty of today’s leading thinkers, writers, and visionaries—among them Cory Doctorow, Gregory Benford, Elizabeth Bear, Bruce Sterling, and Neal Stephenson—to contribute works of “techno-optimism” that challenge us to dream and do Big Stuff. Engaging, mind-bending, provocative, and imaginative, Hieroglyph offers a forward-thinking approach to the intersection of art and technology that has the power to change our world. 

brucesterling:

*You should buy this book so that more universities will come up with weird projects like this.

http://www.harpercollins.com/9780062204691/hieroglyph

About the Book

Inspired by New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson, an anthology of stories, set in the near future, from some of today’s leading writers, thinkers, and visionaries that reignites the iconic and optimistic visions of the golden age of science fiction.

In his 2011 article “Innovation Starvation,” Neal Stephenson argued that we—the society whose earlier scientists and engineers witnessed the airplane, the automobile, nuclear energy, the computer, and space exploration—must reignite our ambitions to think boldly and do Big Stuff. He also advanced the Hieroglyph Theory which illuminates the power of science fiction to inspire the inventive imagination: “Good SF supplies a plausible, fully thought-out picture of an alternate reality in which some sort of compelling innovation has taken place.”

In 2012, Arizona State University established the Center for Science and the Imagination to bring together writers, artists, and creative thinkers with scientists, engineers, and technologists to cultivate and expand on “moon shot ideas” that inspire the imagination and catalyze real-world innovations.

Now comes this remarkable anthology uniting twenty of today’s leading thinkers, writers, and visionaries—among them Cory Doctorow, Gregory Benford, Elizabeth Bear, Bruce Sterling, and Neal Stephenson—to contribute works of “techno-optimism” that challenge us to dream and do Big Stuff. Engaging, mind-bending, provocative, and imaginative, Hieroglyph offers a forward-thinking approach to the intersection of art and technology that has the power to change our world. 

From Syd Mead’s Kronovecta Sketchbook: Deckard’s Blade Runner Sedan


Deckard’s Sedan was intended to be a private vehicle representing the “state of the art” for the time frame of the film. Assuming internal lift technology for the Spinner also assumed the same capability for other expensive vehicles. I started with imagining an elite “flying” sedan which had been decommissioned from flight use and now would be forever limited to street use only. Fore and aft aerodynamic panels, vectoring nozzles and directional control vanes had been removed. The Sedan as built for the film was, then, the “core” vehicle enclosure, with ground wheels, traffic lights and impact bumpers added for legal ground traffic use. The result was an intense, rolling mechanical mismatch of silhouettes resembling the general size and proportions of the familiar “sedan.” Several prop cars were built by Gene Winfield, who also built the Spinners and Sebastian’s van.
—Syd Mead
Sketches drawn 6/22/1980

From Syd Mead’s Kronovecta Sketchbook: Deckard’s Blade Runner Sedan

Deckard’s Sedan was intended to be a private vehicle representing the “state of the art” for the time frame of the film. Assuming internal lift technology for the Spinner also assumed the same capability for other expensive vehicles. I started with imagining an elite “flying” sedan which had been decommissioned from flight use and now would be forever limited to street use only. Fore and aft aerodynamic panels, vectoring nozzles and directional control vanes had been removed. The Sedan as built for the film was, then, the “core” vehicle enclosure, with ground wheels, traffic lights and impact bumpers added for legal ground traffic use. The result was an intense, rolling mechanical mismatch of silhouettes resembling the general size and proportions of the familiar “sedan.” Several prop cars were built by Gene Winfield, who also built the Spinners and Sebastian’s van.

—Syd Mead

Sketches drawn 6/22/1980

wannabeanimator:

Disney’s Master Teachers: Life Drawing For Animation at WonderCon 2014

longnowsalon:

The ESA Rosetta mission has narrowed down to 5 possible landing spots on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Via brucesterling:

*Looking for a spot to land on a comet
http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Rosetta/Rosetta_Landing_site_search_narrows

longnowsalon:

The ESA Rosetta mission has narrowed down to 5 possible landing spots on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Via brucesterling:

*Looking for a spot to land on a comet

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Rosetta/Rosetta_Landing_site_search_narrows

futuramobiles:

1989 Pontiac Stinger