New City

Design, science fiction, art, space, culture, childhood, life. Curated by Joe and Chris.

factoidlabs:

futuramobiles:

1939 Aero Model 50 Sodomka Special Roadster

Ride.

GM Styling Firebird III Concept, 1959

GM Styling Firebird III Concept, 1959

midcenturymodernfreak:

1967 Disneyland Ticket Booth Tomorrowland | Design: Imagineer Rolly Crump - Via

midcenturymodernfreak:

1967 Disneyland Ticket Booth Tomorrowland | Design: Imagineer Rolly Crump - Via

(via ultra-pulp-images)

(via parislemon)

cardboardlife:

A few people asked me for pictures of my gif making set-up and what software I used. I don’t do everything the same way. The easiest way is to take a series of photos with my camera or phone and then open them in photoshop and make them into a gif with the Photoshop animation thing. I do this with 2D animations too with scanned pieces of paper rather than photos.
The software that I sometimes use is “Boinx iStopMotion” (that’s what I’m using in the photo). I have a Nikon D3100 plugged into it (before I had this camera I used to use a webcam). It’s easier to animate with iStopMotion because it has onion skinning so you can see the previous frame at the same time as the new frame. I think any animation software you can find would have this feature.
What else can I tell you? The “set” is just some pieces of coloured card. The background piece of pink card is leaning against some heavy things and also blu-tacked to them so it won’t move. Everything is blu-tacked in place (including the camera which is blu-tacked to that pink sketchbook and the sketchbook is blu-tacked to the table).
If you want to try making stop-motion gifs I would suggest getting a gif making app and film it with your phone. Just make sure you fix your phone in place (with blu-tack if you like) so that it doesn’t move while you take the photos).

cardboardlife:

A few people asked me for pictures of my gif making set-up and what software I used. I don’t do everything the same way. The easiest way is to take a series of photos with my camera or phone and then open them in photoshop and make them into a gif with the Photoshop animation thing. I do this with 2D animations too with scanned pieces of paper rather than photos.

The software that I sometimes use is “Boinx iStopMotion” (that’s what I’m using in the photo). I have a Nikon D3100 plugged into it (before I had this camera I used to use a webcam). It’s easier to animate with iStopMotion because it has onion skinning so you can see the previous frame at the same time as the new frame. I think any animation software you can find would have this feature.

What else can I tell you? The “set” is just some pieces of coloured card. The background piece of pink card is leaning against some heavy things and also blu-tacked to them so it won’t move. Everything is blu-tacked in place (including the camera which is blu-tacked to that pink sketchbook and the sketchbook is blu-tacked to the table).

If you want to try making stop-motion gifs I would suggest getting a gif making app and film it with your phone. Just make sure you fix your phone in place (with blu-tack if you like) so that it doesn’t move while you take the photos).

modernism-in-metroland:

Your Britain Fight for it Now poster (1943) by Abram Games.
This World War II propaganda poster, featuring Finsbury Health Centre, was produced by graphic designer Abram Games, who later designed the official Festival of Britain poster in 1951. This poster fell foul of Winston Churchill, who banned it due to its depiction of child with rickets in the London slums.
#design
Image from Save Finsbury Health Centre.

modernism-in-metroland:

Your Britain Fight for it Now poster (1943) by Abram Games.

This World War II propaganda poster, featuring Finsbury Health Centre, was produced by graphic designer Abram Games, who later designed the official Festival of Britain poster in 1951. This poster fell foul of Winston Churchill, who banned it due to its depiction of child with rickets in the London slums.

#design

Image from Save Finsbury Health Centre.

(via ultra-pulp-images)

trekart:

Shuttle Craft Cake by Danosuke on deviantART

trekart:

Shuttle Craft Cake by Danosuke on deviantART

(via startrekships)

thecultureengine:

Ford Mustang Milano Concept, 1970

thecultureengine:

Ford Mustang Milano Concept, 1970

(via thingsmagazine)

womeninspace:

Cosmonaut Elena Serova in zero-G training.
Source: Corbis

womeninspace:

Cosmonaut Elena Serova in zero-G training.

Source: Corbis