New City

Design, science fiction, art, space, culture, childhood, life. Curated by Joe and Chris.

new-aesthetic:

Dad gets OfficeMax mail addressed ‘Daughter Killed in Car Crash’ - Los Angeles Times

An off-and-on customer of OfficeMax, Mike Seay has gotten the office supply company’s junk mail for years. But the mail that the grieving Lindenhurst, Ill., father said he got from OfficeMax last week was different. It was addressed to “Mike Seay, Daughter Killed in Car Crash.” Strange as that sounds, the mail reached the right guy. Seay’s daughter Ashley, 17, was killed in a car crash with her boyfriend last year. OfficeMax somehow knew. And in a world where bits of personal data are mined from customers and silently sold off and shuffled among corporations, Seay appears to be the victim of some marketing gone horribly wrong.

new-aesthetic:

Dad gets OfficeMax mail addressed ‘Daughter Killed in Car Crash’ - Los Angeles Times

An off-and-on customer of OfficeMax, Mike Seay has gotten the office supply company’s junk mail for years. But the mail that the grieving Lindenhurst, Ill., father said he got from OfficeMax last week was different. It was addressed to “Mike Seay, Daughter Killed in Car Crash.” Strange as that sounds, the mail reached the right guy. Seay’s daughter Ashley, 17, was killed in a car crash with her boyfriend last year. OfficeMax somehow knew. And in a world where bits of personal data are mined from customers and silently sold off and shuffled among corporations, Seay appears to be the victim of some marketing gone horribly wrong.

How to build an African concept car in 12 weeks - we make money not art →

brucesterling:

http://www.nicolasnova.net/pasta-and-vinegar/2014/9/19/futures-a-short-interview-with-bruce-sterling


"This is the second interview of the series I started last week, based on my recent book about future, sci-fi and design fictions. After Warren Ellis, here’s Bruce Sterling (whose blogging have moved to this wonderful tumblr called ‘Wolf in Living Room’:
"NN: In your opinion, as a science-fiction writer, how to you perceive this difficulty to go beyond the standard visions of "the Future" (from flying cars to humanoid robots)?
"BS: At SXSW 2014 I was on a panel with Warren Ellis, Joi Ito and Daniel Suarez where an interesting atemporal design-fiction issue came up.  We science fiction writers were discussing the problem of inventing something far-fetched, satirical, extrapolative or socially critical and then discovering that it was already commercially available on the shelves of Wal-Mart.  This was immediately called the “Wal-Mart Problem.”
"Atemporally speaking, it’s clearly possible to write a form of "futuristic" science fiction in which all the "sci-fi gadgets" are already real objects in Wal-Mart. …"

brucesterling:

http://www.nicolasnova.net/pasta-and-vinegar/2014/9/19/futures-a-short-interview-with-bruce-sterling

"This is the second interview of the series I started last week, based on my recent book about future, sci-fi and design fictions. After Warren Ellis, here’s Bruce Sterling (whose blogging have moved to this wonderful tumblr called ‘Wolf in Living Room’:

"NN: In your opinion, as a science-fiction writer, how to you perceive this difficulty to go beyond the standard visions of "the Future" (from flying cars to humanoid robots)?

"BS: At SXSW 2014 I was on a panel with Warren Ellis, Joi Ito and Daniel Suarez where an interesting atemporal design-fiction issue came up.  We science fiction writers were discussing the problem of inventing something far-fetched, satirical, extrapolative or socially critical and then discovering that it was already commercially available on the shelves of Wal-Mart.  This was immediately called the “Wal-Mart Problem.”

"Atemporally speaking, it’s clearly possible to write a form of "futuristic" science fiction in which all the "sci-fi gadgets" are already real objects in Wal-Mart. …"

davidmillerphotoworks:

Today’s cobbled together #animation studio. Yes it is quite ghetto. Iphone set w iMotion lays on top. HOWEVER… I am of the firm belief that you cannot wait until you have the perfect budget or best equipment to create things, you just have to bully through and make a LOT whether it’s perfect or problematic. If you aren’t productive and don’t challenge yourself you never overcome your mistakes, never figure out ways to improve. #diy

Great advice. starblade take note! ;-)

davidmillerphotoworks:

Today’s cobbled together #animation studio. Yes it is quite ghetto. Iphone set w iMotion lays on top. HOWEVER… I am of the firm belief that you cannot wait until you have the perfect budget or best equipment to create things, you just have to bully through and make a LOT whether it’s perfect or problematic. If you aren’t productive and don’t challenge yourself you never overcome your mistakes, never figure out ways to improve. #diy

Great advice. starblade take note! ;-)

longnowsalon:

On NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory you can see stunning images of our Sun. This is a modified animation based on that photography by ageofdestruction:

spectrum: The Sun, photographed by Solar Dynamics Observatory, 28th August 2014.

10 frames; each frame is a composite of 3 images in different wavelengths. Here, I have used 3 wavelengths in the extreme UV range (17.1, 19.3, and 21.1 nm), for the blue, green, and red channels which usually represent visible light of about 475, 530, and 680 nm, respectively.

Sequence covers about 11 hours.

Image credit: NASA/SDO, AIA/EVE/HMI. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

artlung:

Finished! And a Cylon! (at Westfield MainPlace)

This is by starblade!
After posting this to Facebook, another pal sent me this message:

The nerd in me feels COMPELLED to say that, while I loved the drawing by your friend, colonial laser shots are yellow/orange with a red background. The cylon shots were blue. I’m saying this not as any kind of slam against your friend; I just wanted to display the DEPTH of my geekiness (for old skool BSG)

artlung:

Finished! And a Cylon! (at Westfield MainPlace)

This is by starblade!

After posting this to Facebook, another pal sent me this message:

The nerd in me feels COMPELLED to say that, while I loved the drawing by your friend, colonial laser shots are yellow/orange with a red background. The cylon shots were blue. I’m saying this not as any kind of slam against your friend; I just wanted to display the DEPTH of my geekiness (for old skool BSG)

handa:

La cite de l automobile, a photo from Alsace, East | TrekEarth

handa:

La cite de l automobile, a photo from Alsace, East | TrekEarth

wannabeanimator:

How to be a successful concept artist for Hollywood films | Bobby Chiu

adamwarrencomics:

Scans of a 5-page piece I did for Wizard magazine way back in 1997, in a halcyon year that saw my first two mainstream projects dropping: Titans: Scissors, Paper, Stone for DC, and Gen13 Bootleg for Wildstorm (years before their purchase by DC). Yeahp, for a little while there, my comics career was kinda cooking, wasn’t it? Oh, well.

Anyhoo, the inherent joke of this "Basic Training" pseudo-tutorial was that I addressed the unfortunate stereotype of manga-influenced artwork  being little more than “big eyes and speed lines” by, well, blithering about nothing but big eyes and speed lines! How very self-contradictingly metatextual, huh?

Note, by the way, that the pages were in uninked pencil because I was still working on Gen13 Bootleg at the time, and couldn’t spare the time to ink the damn things. This, alas, was long before I figured out the pencils-only technique I’d later use for Empowered (my ongoing “sexy superhero comedy” series published by Dark Horse Comics, he added parenthetically and shamelessly). Man, I don’t even wanna think about how much more work I could’ve cranked out back then if that approach had been known to me… Oh, well, again. 

In closing, I should note that the text has a few slightly puzzling edits, including page 2’s cryptic addition of the line "That’s the main reason manga are in black and white," which certainly wasn’t my actual opinion. (And, for the record, I tried to avoid using the term "manga-style" about my work, period.) Beyond that, the rest of the text (and artwork!) hasn’t aged all that gracefully, but a few of the bits about speed-line usage might still be vaguely useful. Gotta say, back then I was always annoyed by American artists’ lame attempts at speed-line usage, as very few ever bothered to closely study their usage in manga (patterns, group numbers, fixed vanishing points, thick-thin vs. single-line-weight, moiré effects, branching out of black areas, motion blurs, etc).

xombiedirge:

Guardians of the Galaxy: Location Concept Art by Kev Jenkins